How does PIP differ from DLA

How does Personal Independence Payment differ from Disability Living Allowance?

  • Components: Disability Living Allowance (DLA) had a mobility component and a care component, whereas Personal Independence Payment (PIP) has a mobility component and a daily living component – PIP is not concerned with any care a person needs at night
  • Rates: the care component of DLA had three rates, whereas the daily living component of PIP has only two – PIP is less concerned with people who have low care needs
  • Aids and adaptations: DLA took account of some adaptations, such as prosthetic limbs, but not others, such as wheelchairs, whereas PIP takes account of all aids and adaptations
  • Length of awards: most people who received DLA had “indefinite” or “lifetime” awards, whereas most PIP awards will be fixed-term and all PIP awards may be reviewed at any time
  • Presence: a person usually had to have been present in Britain for 26 of the last 52 weeks to be paid DLA, whereas a person usually has to have been present in Britain for 104 of the last 156 weeks to be awarded PIP
  • Residence: a person had to be ordinarily resident in Britain to be awarded DLA, whereas a person has to be habitually resident in Britain to be awarded PIP and generally not subject to immigration control
  • Automatic entitlement: certain conditions gave a person an automatic entitlement to a particular rate of one of the components of DLA, whereas the only people entitled automatically to a particular rate of one of the components of PIP are terminally ill people – who are automatically entitled to the enhanced rate of the daily living component
  • Forwards and backwards: a person was only paid DLA if they had a disability or long-term condition which had already existed for at least three months and was expected to continue for at least a further six months, whereas a person will only be paid PIP if they have a disability or long-term condition that has already existed for at least three months and is expected to continue for at least a further nine months – these rules don’t apply to people who are terminally ill